The following is a brief overview of The Stone of Destiny: In Search of the Truth Buy the eBook and read the complete story

Chapter 7
Finding the Lost Ten Tribes of Israel

Introduction
Chapter 1 – Events Leading up to the Theft
Chapter 2 – The Legend: From Bethel to Scone
Chapter 3 – A Potted Pre-History of Scotland
Chapter 4 – The Coming of the Patron Saint
Chapter 5 – St Fillan & Bannockburn
Chapter 6 – The Stone of Destiny?
Chapter 7 – Finding the Lost Ten Tribes of Israel
Chapter 8 – Destiny in the 21st Century
Conclusions 

With so much uncertainty surrounding the entire Stone of Destiny story, it is important not to take the viewpoint that ‘if there are no hard facts, then it’s just a myth and therefore irrelevant’, because one thing that has been seen in recent years is the power that a story, especially a fictional one, can have on a huge number of the population. Enter Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code.

The authors of this work personally know several of the non-fiction authors whose work Brown used to support the claims made in his fictional novel. With our interests in historical research, we were already very familiar with the many mysteries surrounding Rosslyn Chapel, and during the great Da Vinci Code lure of 2005/2006 we were asked to provide tours and give speeches to vast numbers of people, typically middle-aged American women who were on their own personal enlightenment, or Grail quest for inner harmony in an ever-increasingly chaotic world. The Da Vinci Code had struck a chord with something inside these women, who were mostly of the Christian faith, and who finally had a female role model of utmost importance to their faith – Mary Magdalene had gone from whore to heroine overnight. There were vast numbers of people now going into Rosslyn Chapel, all being inspired by a work of fiction to travel thousands of miles to make their personal pilgrimage in search of a truth that they felt they had been denied by the Catholic Church for nearly 2000 years.

The above goes to illustrate how even in the modern day, when we have access to an almost infinite database of information, i.e. the internet, people can be motivated enough by the question “What if there is a kernel of truth to the story?” The most important thing is what that seeking question inspires the individual to do next with their life, and not whether all information they have is factually correct. It is the power of faith. We are, even now, fighting wars to ensure that each individual has the right to believe what they want to, and no reasonably minded unbiased person can ever deny that they know their beliefs, whatever they may be, to be the one and only truth for everyone in the Universe. It is not for this work to enter into the debate about whether the claims of The Da Vinci Code are based on any truth, but suffice to say, such a phenomenon as described here has occurred recently and is without doubt. However, the story can get so much more interesting, and the Stone of Destiny sits right at the very centre.

In the mid-1800s, a movement began to appear in Britain known as the British-Israel Society, or Brith Society (‘Brith’, being the Hebrew word for ‘Covenant’). The Covenant, on which they base the societies name, was that made by God to Jacob when he rested his head upon the stone and was told about the legacy of his offspring (see Chapter 2). The basic tenet of the Brith Society was that the British people were descended from the ten tribes of Israel who did not return to Palestine after the Assyrian captivity in Babylon but instead ventured to the ‘isles afar off’ (Isiah 66:19), implying Britain.

It was mentioned earlier how the two tribes that did return from captivity in Babylon, the Tribes of Judah and Levi (as well as a minority from the Tribe of Benjamin), are the people who in turn become known to us as the Jews. The term ‘Jew’ does not apply to those of the remaining ten tribes who dispersed elsewhere, most likely to the more fertile north, and of whom the Bible makes very little reference following their captivity. The Brith Society believe that the promises made by God to Jacob apply to all twelve tribes, and not exclusively to the Jews. With this belief in mind, they set to prove the ancestry of the British people, and in truth, this was not very difficult for them to achieve.

The British Empire was at its strongest during this period, and the phrase that ‘the sun never sets on the British Empire’ was, to many, all the proof that was needed that God was making true His promise that Israel would rule over the Earth. The Brith Society believed in the literal word of the Bible and used the prophecies contained therein to prove and validate their claims. One such claim was that of the ‘seven times’ punishment for the Hebrews who disobeyed God, as described in Leviticus chapter 26. Such a punishment was also mentioned in Daniel 4:23 as being given to King Nebuchadnezzar.

It was believed that when a man serves a people, a ‘time’ is equal to a year, e.g. 1 time/year = 360 times/days/year. Therefore, based on the Brith Society beliefs, the ‘seven times’ punishment for the Hebrews was equal to 2520 years (7 x 360) in which they were to be punished for their national pride and disobedience. Biblical dates are very difficult to cite with any certainty, but the Brith Society calculated the date of the Assyrian invasion of Israel as beginning in 740BC. In 710BC, thirty years later, the Assyrians came up against all the defended cities of Judah, and took them, thus signifying the start of the Assyrian captivity and the beginning of the seven times punishment. If we add 2520 years to 710BC we come to the date of 1811CE (there is no year 0) in which the punishment of God would end. This coincided with the dominance of the British Empire and the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo, which left Britain as the undisputed superpower of Europe, not to mention the coming of its industrial revolution‚Ķ

With the prophecy seemingly having been fulfilled, it would have been easy to think that God had so favourably chosen the British people, and there was one thing that really proved such a descent – the British Monarchs were all crowned upon Jacob’s Pillow, the Covenant Stone. Whether we believe this or not today is irrelevant, because it was certainly believed at the time by a very large body of people, just as today there is a similar belief resounding throughout much of the ultra-religious Christian United States of America. Similar conditions apply to America today as they did to the British Empire when the Brith movement was at its most prominent, and America is a concoction of all races of people from all over the globe, so surely the descendants of the twelve tribes would naturally congregate on such a blessed country in preparation for the coming Armageddon? The real question is, could there be any substance to these claims by the Brith Society?

When the Declaration of Arbroath was signed in 1320, it was certainly believed that the Scots were descended from the Scythians, whose land was to the north of the Black Sea where the ten tribes are believed to have emigrated in their search for more fertile grounds (they would have known that to go south was more desert and ‘back the way they came’ through enemy territory). There is certainly a tradition of migration from the Middle East to Britain and modern DNA is proving that much of the Celtic blood originated in Spain, which again gives support to the authenticity of the legend.

John Wilson in his Lectures on Our Israelitish Origin (fifth edition, 1876) was one of the first people to write about the idea of the British people being descended from the lost ten tribes, but many others were to follow. One such author, William Comyns Beaumont, wrote a book in 1946 titled Britain: The Key to World History in which he puts forth the idea that instead of the ten tribes travelling from Israel to Britain, he suggests that the events portrayed in the Bible actually happened in Britain and not in the Middle East. In his work, he says that the site of modern day Edinburgh was the site of the ancient city of Jerusalem before the Roman Emperor Hadrian had it destroyed around 140 and renamed Aelia Capitolina. Between 139-142, one of the Roman Legions stationed in Britain was awarded the use of the imperial name Aelia (Roman Scotland, p.51), perhaps as a memorial to the destruction of Jerusalem, and the Antonine wall was built soon after, roughly the same time as the Jews were banished from Jerusalem and walls erected to keep them out. Let us also not forget the map of Ptolemy showing the twelve tribes of the Pictish nation, and the claim by Wilson that the ‘Hebrew language is most similar to the lowland Scotch’ (Israelitish Origin, p.189). Perhaps we need to look again at the history of Scotland in Roman times.

Whether or not Beaumont, Wilson and the countless others are correct is, once more, irrelevant, because it was believed, and that is what really counts. It is this belief that drives people on to new ways of thinking, and they could very well be right. Alternatively, they could be wrong – we simply do not know. History is only ever about presenting a most up to date account of the facts, as they appear to be at any one time. There will always be the three sides to any story; the winner’s side, the loser’s side and the unknown.

The question we must now pose is just what relevance does all of this have for the modern day? The answer is perhaps a little unsettling, and this is where we must now direct our attention.


 

Buy The Stone of Destiny as an eBook

Introduction
Chapter 1 – Events Leading up to the Theft
Chapter 2 – The Legend: From Bethel to Scone
Chapter 3 – A Potted Pre-History of Scotland
Chapter 4 – The Coming of the Patron Saint
Chapter 5 – St Fillan & Bannockburn
Chapter 6 – The Stone of Destiny?
Chapter 7 – Finding the Lost Ten Tribes of Israel
Chapter 8 – Destiny in the 21st Century
Conclusions  

 Copyright © 2007-2011 Mark Naples & David Bews

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