The following is a brief overview of The Stone of Destiny: In Search of the Truth Buy the eBook and read the complete story

The Stone of Destiny
In Search of the Truth

By Mark Naples and David Bews

Introduction
Chapter 1 – Events Leading up to the Theft
Chapter 2 – The Legend: From Bethel to Scone
Chapter 3 – A Potted Pre-History of Scotland
Chapter 4 – The Coming of the Patron Saint
Chapter 5 – St Fillan & Bannockburn
Chapter 6 – The Stone of Destiny?
Chapter 7 – Finding the Lost Ten Tribes of Israel
Chapter 8 – Destiny in the 21st Century
Conclusions 

Introduction

The Stone of Destiny, as it is commonly called, is used as part of the coronation ceremony of the British monarchs. It is also known as the Stone of Scone, the Coronation Stone and the Westminster Stone, among several others. The last time it was used in a ceremony was for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II on 2nd June 1953 at Westminster Abbey in London, England. At this time, some Scottish nationalists challenged the right of the Queen to style herself ‘Elizabeth II’ on the grounds that there had never before been an ‘Elizabeth I’ in Scotland. In the case of MacCormick vs. Lord Advocate, the Scottish Court of Session ruled against the plaintiffs, finding that the Queen’s title was a matter of her own choice and prerogative. Nevertheless, to save further debate, it was announced that all future monarchs with a shared name would use the higher ordinal of any preceding English or Scottish monarch. The origin of this sentiment, which is still prevalent in the modern day, has its origins in the legend of the Stone of Destiny.

For the coronation ceremony, the stone is placed in a wooden chair, known as King Edward’s Chair, which the soon-to-be monarch sits upon as they receive the blessing and anointing from the Archbishop of Canterbury, thus confirming them as the rightful monarch and heir to the British throne.

The stone came to England amidst bloodshed and bitter rivalry between England and Scotland in the late 13th century. King Edward I of England had his army forcibly take the stone from its guardian home at Scone Abbey in Perthshire, Scotland, in 1296. His desire to have the stone was partly due to the tradition that the monarchs of Scotland had been crowned upon it since time immemorial, and was thus seen as the most potent symbol of the Scottish right to being a separate nation from England. By removing the stone to England, Edward was making the statement that Scotland should come under his dominion and that the Scots should recognise him as their king. The stone mostly remained in Westminster Abbey until 1996 when it was returned to Scotland amid great political upheaval, and placed on public display in Edinburgh Castle where it remains to this day. However, there are calls from various Scottish MPs to move the stone from Edinburgh and back to Scone where, in their eyes, it rightfully belongs.

The stone was only allowed back to Scotland, 700 years after it had been taken, under strict instruction that it must return to Westminster Abbey for the coronation of the next monarch, which will be either Prince Charles or his son Prince William. No doubt this will stir up great emotions on both sides of the border, and especially so with the renewed fervour of nationalistic Scots pushing for complete political separation from England at every election. Will the Scots freely allow the stone to once again travel beyond the border, to what is essentially a foreign country, for the coronation of what many deem to be a foreign monarch? Without doubt, there will be much to debate.

If this were the only prestige of the stone, then the story would still be very interesting, although perhaps slightly less fantastic than it is, because the stone also comes attached with a legend, which if true, would require us to think more carefully about how we use the past to define who the British people are as a nation.

The legend of the Stone of Destiny is that it was originally from a place called Bethel, in Israel, and was used by the patriarch Jacob as a pillow upon which he rested his head. Whilst doing so, he received a vision from God confirming that Jacob and his offspring are the chosen ones of God’s favour. Over time, these chosen ones become widely known as the Jews, whose fight for their promised land – Israel – still rages on today in an increasingly ferocious manner, with modern weapons just as bloodthirsty as God’s wrath.

So how and why did this stone, which is important to the Children of Israel, come to be associated with the British Monarchy?

To answer this question we must look at all aspects of history, meaning that a myth or legend can be just as important as an established fact. It is often said how written history is the story told by the victors of a battle, but this does not confer a very accurate true history as there are always three sides to every story – the winners side, the losers side, and the unknown – thus making it practically impossible to know what historical ‘truth’ really is. The best that any historian can hope for is that their work is accepted upon its release as the most up-to-date and authoritative portrayal of events, which subsequently inspires others to come forward with their version of the ‘unknown’ to focus on the clearest view as possible of what can only ever be slightly blurred at best.

The history of the Stone of Destiny is vast and complicated, yet immensely interesting. It is the symbol of perhaps the greatest feud that the British Isles has ever witnessed that still rages on well over 700 years after it began – that between England and Scotland. Yet, if the legend has any basis in fact, the Stone of Destiny could be one of the most important religious relics in the world, which places it at the centre of a much larger global feud – that of God’s favour.

 

Buy The Stone of Destiny as an eBook

Introduction
Chapter 1 – Events Leading up to the Theft
Chapter 2 – The Legend: From Bethel to Scone
Chapter 3 – A Potted Pre-History of Scotland
Chapter 4 – The Coming of the Patron Saint
Chapter 5 – St Fillan & Bannockburn
Chapter 6 – The Stone of Destiny?
Chapter 7 – Finding the Lost Ten Tribes of Israel
Chapter 8 – Destiny in the 21st Century
Conclusions  



 Copyright © 2007-2011 Mark Naples & David Bews

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